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  • Women Who Are Abused
    Women Who Are Abused

    25%

  • Men Who Are Abused Each year
    Men Who Are Abused Each year

    3,000,000

  • Children Who Suffer from Abuse
    Children Who Suffer from Abuse

    45%

  • Percent of Assaults at Home
    Percent of Assaults at Home

    60%

News & Events

The Recovery Process

Something that most people do not understand about domestic abuse is that the victim loses their self-worth. It is very hard to maintain who you are when someone else has taken your self-worth and slammed it to the very bottom of your soul. The victim becomes a very different person, one rule by thoughts of how their words and actions will be received by their abuser. The victim often does not know their self anymore. Their hopes, their dreams, and their thoughts become so wrapped up in what their abuser thinks and feels that they can’t find themselves.

Part of the recovery process for survivors after leaving an abusive relationship is learning what matters to them. This can be a long process. The survivor must take time to slowly explore different things. This can be as simple as tasting a new food or trying a new activity. Learning new things by reading, traveling, or taking classes can also help to reconnect with their inner self. Alone time, meditation, prayer, and deep thought can help significantly as well.

As the person reconnects with their self, spending time with trusted friends and family is also important. Building relationships is a critical processes for recovery. Survivors frequently have difficulty trusting. It is okay to start with a small group and work toward broadening the friendship base over time. Above all, they should be kind to themselves and take time to pamper themselves. They need it and deserve it!

When you’ve left an abusive relationship, it may take time to feel safe and secure in a new home. You want to be able to feel comfortable in your new space, but it is fairly common for domestic violence survivors to feel uneasy or cautious about settling in a new home with new routines. This uneasiness is perfectly natural; be patient with yourself.

When a child experiences domestic violence (witnessing violence between parents or exercising violence toward a parent), certain lies are imprinted in their subconscious. These lies can lead to abuse in later life, illness and mental health issues.

Uncovering the truth is a healing process that allows adults to recover from their pain. Educating children experiencing domestic violence can save them from a life of self-doubt, guilt, resentment and anger.

Foundation4 Domestic Violence Prevention is proud to have been chosen by Childhood Domestic Violence Association to offer the tools they have created as part of our educational programming. To request a speaker to share these tools, please call 844-900-4DVP.